Great Hospitality Brings Great Friendship

(Part 3 of a 3 part series on Hospitality)
You can see the rest of the series here: Part 1 & Part 2.
kids hanging out at my house
Kids hanging out at my house
"Tiavo ny namanao tohaka ny tenanao.” ~Malagasy Proverb
                  (Love you friend as yourself)

            One of my fondest memories of my time in Vondrozo was the friendships that I had.  Not just with my best friends at site or the kids that were always hanging out at my house, but with everyone. 

5 Things Malagasy People Do to Make You Feel Welcome


(Part 2 of a 3 part series on Hospitality)
You can see the rest of the series here: Part 1 & Part 3.

            The Malagasy people are some of the most welcoming people I have ever encountered.  Their culture is one that fosters friendship, community, and hospitality.  In light of this I have put together a list of five things that Malagasy people do that makes me feel welcome here.

greeting
Two of the Malagasy language trainers greeting each other
1. Greeting
            In Madagascar greetings are an essential part of the everyday interactions that make up the

How to Say Hello Malagasy Style

(Part 1 of a 3 part series on Hospitality)
You can see the rest of the series here: Part 2 & Part 3.

            In Madagascar there are 18 official Malagasy dialects, and many more local dialects, that vary in both pronunciation and vocabulary from one another.  One of the greatest differences in the dialects is the way people greet each other.  In celebration of hospitality I have created a video of just some of these different dialectal greetings.  All of the videos are relatively the same interaction, with a few variations, of people saying “Hello. What new?” and responding “Hello. Nothing much.”

I’d also like to give a special thank you to the Peace Corps LCFs (Language and Cultural

Ankarana National Park

trail in ankarana national park
             Ankarana is a national park in northern Madagascar near the small village of Mahamasina.  It is known mainly for its tsingy, bat caves, and for being the home of the only known cave dwelling crocodiles, but the park is also steeped in the history of the Antankarana people that live in this area and has many taboos for those that should want to visit.  

Dear Future Peace Corps Volunteer

This post is part of Blogging Abroad's 2017 New Years Blog Challenge, week four: Change and Hope.

“The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.” ~ William Shakespeare


Dear Future Peace Corps Volunteer,
Peace Corps is truly a grassroots organization.  We work on sustainable developmental projects to help better the lives of those in our community.  We serve in towns and villages, learn the local language, live in local housing, and in almost every way of life live like those around us.  Our communities' way of life and their culture becomes our own and this place so far away from what we were used to becomes home.  

Stage 45 Peace Corps Madagascar

A Country Disconnected




            What happens if a country becomes cut off from the internet?  It’s hard to think of that even being a possibility in this day and age, but it can happen.  Just a thing happened here in Madagascar just a few weeks ago. 
            Madagascar has three service providers that provide telephone and internet service to its population.  Just a few weeks ago Telma’s, the largest of the three providers, undersea line was cut and the provider’s entire internet service went down.  This would not be such a big deal with there being other providers, but Telma is used by a large majority of the people and businesses here in Madagascar.  This meant that places like the Bank of Africa, the Embassy, and most of the local internet cafes all went down.  A whole country seemingly came to a crashing halt.  It was reported that Telma had to run a new undersea line from South Africa and that the process would probably take approximately 15 days.  This put Telma in a frenzy to find a solution for its most prominent clients.  Fortunately, they were able to broker a deal with Orange, the country’s second largest provider, to siphon some of their bandwidth.  This allowed the Bank to come back online and more prominent offices to do limited work. 
            This all happened about a week after the internet went down but I was unaware of it till a few days afterwards.  Where I live, and in my regional office, we were down for the entirety of the time the internet was down.  Since our entire workload is based through the internet we were cut off from it all.  This is not that big of a deal in the grand scheme of things.  It wasn’t that long ago that everything was done on paper or in person/phone call.  But it was something we all took for granted.  A world without internet is a little liberating and I enjoyed the freedom that it brought, but it sure makes things so much harder. 

In Death There is Life

 This post is part of Blogging Abroad's 2017 New Years Blog Challenge, week three: Cultural Differences.


“As members of society, most of us see only what we expect to see, and what we expect to see is what we are conditioned to see when we have learned the definitions and classifications of our culture.” ~The Forest of Symbols


            Cultural differences can make it hard to find similarities between oneself and other people from around the world.  To the unaccustomed eye these cultural differences can seem strange, odd, or just wrong.  We are quick to judge cultural differences without truly understanding the meaning behind them. This is not exactly a fault of our own.  Each person grows up learning a certain set of values and beliefs and when these are challenged by something that seems new and different it is natural to brush them aside as unusual without acknowledging the fact that to others they are entirely normal.  We do this often times without even seeing the similarities.  
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