Gaudí Architecture

Gaudí Architecture


Antoni Gaudí was inspired by nature, a genius architect, a creative artist, and far ahead of his time. He made his mark on the world never-before-seen building systems that were as brilliant as they were unique. For 43 years Gaudí would make unprecedented and symbolic buildings that would define the streets of Barcelona.


La Sagrada Familia



La Sagrada Familia
La Sagrada Familia


La Sagrada Familia is Antoni Gaudí's best-known work and is hands-down an undisputed symbol of Barcelona. Although the building of this church began in 1882 with the laying of its foundation, Gaudí didn’t assume commission of the project until 1883. His new vision was far more ambitious than his predecessor’s, including the construction of a temple with 5 naves, a transept, an apse, an exterior ambulatory, 3 façades, and 18 towers; as well as making it both the tallest building in Barcelona and church in the world.


La Sagrada Familia would be Gaudí ’s greatest project and he would work on it until his death in 1926, although he would not make it his sole obsession until 1914 when he ceased his work on civil projects. Since his death the construction has continued under the leadership of six other architects and is expected to finish in 2026. La Sagrada Familia is now one of seven Guadi constructions that are considered UNESCO World Heritage Sites and is truly a site to be seen.


Cost: €26/$30.95 (must be bought online)
Hours: Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays from 9 am – 6 pm


Parc Güell


Parc Güell
Parc Güell


Parc Güell, in truth, is a failed project by Antoni Gaudí turned UNESCO World Heritage Site. Commissioned in 1900 by Eusebi Güell to be a “garden city” of 60 villas, it was soon realized that most of the terrain was not suitable for building villas. Even though this was the case. Both Güell (from 1907) and Gaudí (from 1906) lived in the park until their deaths. At the time of Güell’s, death his descendants decided to stop work on the park and after Gaudí’s death the park was opened as a public park for Barcelona.


The park is a true marvel to see. Here Antoni Gaudí was both a building and garden architect, melding his inspiration of nature into nature itself. Throughout the park his building designs blend with the movement of the landscape. This is all empathized by colorful sculptures of animals both real and fictional. Parc Güell is now one of seven Guadi constructions that are considered UNESCO World Heritage Sites.


Cost: (much of the park is free) Adult: €10/$11.89, 7-12 yr: €7/$8.33, Under 7: Free
Hours: 9:30 am - 7:30 pm


Casa Milà


Casa Milà
Casa Milà


Casa Milà, locally known as La Pedrera (meaning ‘stone quarry’ in reference to its façade of stone), is Antoni Gaudí’s last civil work; built from 1906 - 1912. Though the construction of Casa Milà was wrought with problems ranging from financial issues with the family to structural issues with the city, the final house is considered an architectural masterpiece. The façade of the building is not weight bearing, but only a curtain wall, allowing for the large windows to be used. This theme continues throughout the building, with hidden steel beams serving as structural elements. This allowed Gaudí to design the floor plan how he pleased.


The floor plan was built around two courtyards that served the purpose of both allowing light and ventilation into the inner rooms. With each floor consisting of four apartments, Gaudí designed the floorplan so that each had both a section of the courtyard and outer wall. Casa Milà is now one of seven Guadi constructions that are considered UNESCO World Heritage Sites.


Cost: (+€3 if bought at the ticket booth) Adult: €24/$28.47, 65+: €18.50/$21.95, 7-12 yr: €12/$14.24, Under 6: Free
Hours: Thursday - Sunday: 9:00 am - 6:30 pm


Casa Batlló


Casa Batlló
Casa Batlló


Casa Batlló was a remodel of a house owned by the wealthy aristocrat, Josep Batlló, from 1904 – 1906. Although the local name for the building is ‘House of Bones,’ Gaudí used colors and shapes found in marine life as inspiration for his creativity of this building; especially those found in coral. His continued theme of nature in his designs shows vividly in Casa Batlló, particularly in the interior where it seems that the goal was to completely avoid the use of straight lines; a characteristic in most of his designs. It is a very colorful and original house that shows off Antoni Gaudí ’s stunning abilities as an architect and artist. Casa Batlló is now one of seven Guadi constructions that are considered UNESCO World Heritage Sites.


Cost: Adult: €35/$41.53, 65+: €32/$37.97, 13-17 yr: €19/$22.54, Under 13: Free
Hours: 9 am - 6:30 pm


Casa Vicens


Casa Vicens
Casa Vicens

 

Casa Vicens is the first house, and one of the first major works, to be built by Antoni Gaudí and is considered to be a prelude to the Modernisme movement. It was built from 1883 - 1885 as a summer estate for the stockbroker Manuel Vicens i Montaner. The use of colorful and decorative ceramics, as well as the corner towers, are inspired by Moorish and Oriental architecture. Breaking with the common stye of the time he created a bold aesthetics with the inspiration of nature throughout both the exterior and interior of the house. Something that would be a theme throughout all of his creations. Casa Vicens is now one of seven Guadi constructions that are considered UNESCO World Heritage Sites.


Cost: (must be bought online) Adult: €16/$18.98, Student & 65+: €14/$16.61, Under 11: Free
Hours: 10:00 am - 8:00 pm


Palau Güell


Palau Güell
Palau Güell


Palau Güell is one of Antoni Guadi’s early works in Barcelona and his first commission from Eusebi Güell. Built from 1885 – 1890, this palace was meant to be both a house and to be a place to host all of the events of the active social life of a Catalan bourgeoisie family. With just 18 x 22 meters of floor space available, Guadi built a magnificent and functional palace in seven floors around a central hall. Making the building noteworthy for its innovative use of space and light. Although the outside is understated in terms of Guidi’s normal designs, the interior is lavish with impressive ironwork, woodwork, ceramics, stained glass, and stonework throughout.


Later, in 1895, Guadi added his typical colorful mosaic chimneys to the roof; an eye-catching contrast to the colorless façade of the building. Altogether there are 20 chimneys on the roof, which also serve to ventilate the house. Palau Güell is now one of seven Guadi constructions that are considered UNESCO World Heritage Sites.


Cost: €5/$5.93 (audio guides need to be downloaded as an app)
Hours: April - October: 10 am - 2 pm & 4 pm to 8 pm; November - March: 10 am - 1.30 pm & 2.30 pm - 6 pm.


Torre Bellesguard


Torre Bellesguard
Torre Bellesguard


The Torre Bellesguard might be one of Gaudí ’s least famous buildings due to it being off the beaten tourist path, but it is impressive non the less. It was on this ground that originally stood the home of the Martin of Aragon, the last king of the Catalan dynasty of the House of Barcelona, who died in 1410. By the time Antoni Gaudí began his work the grand home that once stood there was all but ruins, but Gaudí paid homage to the historic land with his gothic castle design.


Built from 1900 – 1909, the Torre Bellesguard is the only Gaudí building to be continuously used as a private home. Still today, though you can tour the building, it is a private home. It is unique in its design with un-Gaudí like straight lines and a roof stripped bare without his usual burst of color and mosaics. The view from the roof gives truth to the name of the building (beautiful view), with a 360° view of the area.


They are currently only offering 40-minute guided tours every 30 minutes. 

 

Cost: Adults: €10/$11.86; Under 18 & Retirees: €8/$9.49, Under 8: Free
Hours: Monday – Sunday: 10:30 am – 3 pm


Cascada del Parc de la Ciutadella


Citadel of Barcelona
Citadel of Barcelona

 

Once the site of the Citadel of Barcelona, at one time the largest fortress in Europe, it was later mostly destroyed and turned into the 70-acre park that lays there today. In commemoration of the park, Josep Fontseré designed this beautiful fountain in 1875. Although it was built while Anton Gaudí was still an architecture student, he did have a slight role in its production. While working in the studio, Gaudí corrected a mistake of another student in the design of the hydraulics for the fountain and falls.


Cost: Free
Hours: 24/7



Gaudí Architecture

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